Refusing to Back Down: What it Really Means to Speak the Truth “In Love”

Refusing to Back Down: What it Really Means to Speak the Truth “In Love”

On the heels of yet another heated political debate the tweets, status updates, and blogs are running full steam. I would certainly be no exception to this. On the other hand, though, there are many Christians who feel it is offensive to openly talk about their political views or their beliefs on touchy subjects such as homosexuality and abortion. This proverbial “duct tape” silences many well-meaning believers, especially in the world of writing, where platforms and likeability are ranked high on the author’s list of things to succeed in.

No doubt, this is a controversial topic. To speak or not to speak: that is essentially the question. For me the answer came in the form of another question. Do I care so much about getting “likes”, “follows”, and “subscribers” to build my platform that I keep quiet about such topics? What is more important, speaking the truth or being liked?

I live in a state where people have been arrested for holding Bible studies in their homes. Refusing to allow and even prosecuting such acts of religious expression is becoming more common in today’s world. Am I to look the other way when things like, say, who will become the next president would directly affect issues of religious freedom? I’m not convinced that speaking the truth “in love” or having my words “seasoned with salt” means to keep silent. But let’s look at the Bible– because I am human and maybe I am wrong. If so, I want to allow God to correct me and keep me on His path to truth.

First of all we have Jesus and the Sermon on the Mount. The things Jesus said were highly offensive, especially to the Pharisees who were the most “spiritual” people of that time. They knew how to follow all of the rules and live about as perfect as a sinful person could possibly live. But Jesus wasn’t impressed because He saw their hearts. He called them out on their hypocrisy and warned the crowds of listeners not to be like them. I really can’t think of anything more offensive then calling someone out in front of other people, pointing out their faults, and warning the audience not to be like them! But—Jesus was, well, Jesus! As God living and breathing in a human body, He had the right and lived the life to back up His words of truth. I don’t have that luxury. I’m not perfect, I am not God. I cannot see someone’s heart, so publicly calling someone out is probably not a form of expression God has called me to partake in. (And under this light, I am aware of some instances where I have sinned in this area.)

But then we come to Paul. Now, the Colossian Church had become infiltrated with false teachers, and Paul, led by the Spirit of God, stepped in and spoke up about a controversial topic: false teaching. In this same letter to the church he says, “Let your speech be always with grace, seasoned with salt, that ye may know how ye ought to answer every man. (Colossians 4:6)” Several verses in the Bible have been taken out of context to support erroneous practices, and this is probably no exception. It has been used over and over again as an admonition to keep quiet about important issues. In the context of the passage, however, that is absolutely not what Paul is saying. In fact, in the previous three chapters Paul warns the church about following the philosophies of man and the patterns of the world (2:8) while at the same time pointing the congregation to the Solution to their problems (2:9-3:1). Now that is what it means to speak the truth with love and grace.

The difference between condescending pious gibberish and sincere warning in the nature of love and concern come out of a sincere heart focused on the One who has given abundant life as well as freedom from the bondage of evil entanglements.

So what does all of this mean? As Christians we have a responsibility to speak the truth, to always be ready with an answer for the hope that dwells within us. When I stand up and say why I believe one candidate it a better choice for America, I am doing so out of love for my country and the people in it. I do not want to see our religious rights taken away. I want to be able, for instance, to hold a Bible study in my home without fear of retaliation. If one candidate can provide that, then I am going to talk about it. In the same regard, if one candidate is clearly supportive of the dangerous deception that a “woman’s right to choose” or a woman’s right to kill her baby is more important than the life growing inside that woman, as a Christian I have a moral responsibility to speak up for the unborn who cannot speak for themselves. I haven’t always done this, and I live every day with the regret of my silence and what became of a situation where I refused to speak. Never again will I make that mistake.

I think an important distinction in all of this is the delivery used to convey our messages. Are we saying things like, “If you vote for so and so you’re an evil demon of darkness” or are we saying, “I believe so and so is a better candidate because…” One of these expresses a view with respect and dignity while the other bashes on those who would hold a different opinion. I can’t find any example where Paul put down the character of another believer because of the choices they were making, no matter how poor those choices might have been. Instead, I see a great man of God who desperately wanted people to understand the truth, and understand where the truth comes from—Jesus. Paul always, always, always pointed people to Christ. I know I have failed in this area many times (and I confess it to God), but that is my ultimate goal in all I say and do.

I will not apologize for my views because they stem from personal convictions. On the other hand, I want to keep me speech grace-full, making sure to avoid name-calling and character bashing of those who would disagree with me. In the end, for me, I feel it is more important to be real with people rather than sensor my beliefs in the name of “likeability”. Do I want to be a successful author with a large platform to reach others with the message of Hope? Of course I do! But I will not compromise the truth in the form of silence. This is a critical time for our country, and we cannot afford to exchange silence for popularity. Yes, I want to have integrity in all I say and do, especially in a public outlet. But I also want people to know I am a real person, with real struggles, real opinions, and real convictions. Maybe I’ll lose a few “fans” along the way, but ultimately I will be the only one held accountable for my choices. In that regard, God’s opinion of my words and actions are all that really matters.

How about you? Have you experienced backlash in your efforts to speak the truth in love? How has God used your experiences in approaching touchy subjects to teach you how to speak in a grace-full way? Have you every failed in this area of “seasoned” speech? Do you feel it’s more important to convey a certain public “persona” then it is to convey your personal convictions? I look forward to your responses and hope to learn from what God has taught you through your experiences.

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9 thoughts on “Refusing to Back Down: What it Really Means to Speak the Truth “In Love”

  1. well said…it is so important to speak our convictions – not to please man, but to please God! thanks for writing!

  2. My guideline is Philippians 1:12…

    “Wherefore, my beloved, as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.”

    Paul had taught the new believers how to obey the word of God, but he was going away, so he admonished them to keep working out their OWN salvation. (not earning it, but walking it out).

    I think we get into trouble when we think that others ought to walk out their lives the way we do, see things the way we do, speak out or not speak out the way we do. I say if you feel you should speak out, do so in a manner that honors God and if you feel you should remain silent on a subject and hold your tongue, doing so honors God. The important thing is to let God be the guiding factor in someone’s elses life and just focus on our own walk.

    Do I always do that? No, but I’ve come a long way in that department and I’m still growing. I find if I’m focused on living my live the way God wants me to, I don’t have time to correct everyone else.

    For the record…this is not aimed at one court of the other, just stating my opinion.

    • Yup, I agree. This post was born out of a personal conviction. I feel like I am being misunderstood here, though, so I will clarify. I do NOT believe my convictions are every one else’s convictions. I simply felt the need to express my view of this situation. I have seen a lot of posts from people (Christians) who say they couldn’t care less about the election which saddens me. Whether or not a person feels compelled to speak openly is between them and God. But we still, as believers, should show concern for these matters because they directly affect all of us and our relgious freedoms among other things.

      Thanks for your comments.

      • I enjoy your writing and your frankness…and the fact that you allow others to express their thoughts as well. As far as people accusing you of judging…don’t stress about it. I don’t think you’re judging. You’re just expressing your opinion. That’s your right, especially on your own blog or FB page. I just keep in mind that anytime I express my opinion, someone is going to disagree with me. That’s ok, they’re entitled to their opinion, too. Keep writing what’s on your heart, Rebecca.

  3. A person’s choice to remain silent or private about their views may have nothing to do with “likeability,” and everything to do with their conviction to honor God with their tongue (or writing). I understand what you’re saying, and if God told me to, believe me, I would absolutely speak out. But, we also have to be careful not to judge people and their motives for not speaking out.

    • I definitely agree. I also find that just as easy as it is to fall victim to judging someone’s motives for not speaking, one can judge another FOR speaking. I think it’s safe to say we should all follow our own convictions on the matter. I know that’s what you’re doing, and that’s what I’m doing as well. I appreciate you taking the time to comment even if you disagree with my “heart” on this issue.

      • I’m not saying I necessarily “disagree” with your “heart.” There’s a time and place for speaking up. And anyone who knows me well knows I don’t have a problem with confrontation, if necessary. But, I had written the following comment on Facebook this morning.

        “I really cannot stand politics, on any level. But, unfortunately, where there are people, there are politics. No clear way around it. I WILL vote, because I think it’s important to use the voice and freedom God has given us. I prefer to keep quiet about my personal views, because I despise the dissention politics causes between people. Regardless of who wins, God calls us to love one another.”

        A couple of hours following my status post, I recieved notification of your post and read this. I know you see all of my FB statuses, so maybe I took this one a little personally. I don’t know your motives, nor do you know mine. So I guess it’s safe to say, none of us should make assumptions.

        With that said, I love you Rebecca, and I’m proud of you for writing your convictions.

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